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Boris Johnson ‘might split the biggest party in 200 years by insisting on passports for Covid vaccine’

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A senior Conservative Party official has warned that Boris Johnson could lead to the first split in the Conservative Party in nearly 200 years if he brings required passports for a vaccine.

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Lawmakers have accused the prime minister’s administration of trying to turn Britain into a “Beijing-style democracy” amid an angry row over passports for compulsory university vaccinations.

The prime minister was said to have been ‘enraged’ about the relative decline in Covid uptake of youngsters, and suggested the move to hoist prices.

This could unkind that students will not be allowed to return to campus in September unless they can prove they have been double-applied.

The vice president of the Covid Recovery Group of Tories, Steve Baker, told The Sun it was a ‘shocking suggestion’ that likely wouldn’t be ‘helpful’.

He added: Who are they now trying to coerce? The education of whom they are now trying to deny?

“I think the government is in dreadful danger of irreversibly splitting the Conservative Party – following all we’ve been through with Brexit.”

Johnson had previously ruled out passports for the vaccines, but then pledged to bring them to nightclubs at the end of September, and is also said to be considering attending colleges, festivals and football matches.

A senior Conservative has warned that Boris Johnson could cause the first split in the Conservative Party in nearly 200 years if he introduces required 'vaccine passports'.

A senior Conservative has warned that Boris Johnson could cause the first split in the Conservative Party in nearly 200 years if he brings required passports for a vaccine.

The latest NHS England figures show just 58.6 per cent of people aged 18-24 have received a single injection of Covid, compared to rates of over 90 per cent in most older age groups.

The Prime Minister was said to have been 'enraged' about the relatively low consumption of Covid among young people, and suggested moving to hoist prices (Pictured: Latitude Festival, July 25)

The Prime Minister was said to have been ‘enraged’ about the relatively low consumption of Covid among young people, and suggested moving to hoist prices (Pictured: Latitude Festival, July 25)

Fellow Conservative MP Mark Harper said Downing Street was making vaccinations required through the back door with threats to deprive those who reject a college education.

The survey found that young people are abandoning confront masks in big numbers

A unused survey by YouGov shows that the use of confront masks among young people has declined since “Freedom Day” on July 19.

The survey found that 46 percent of 18-24-year-olds said they had used a confront mask in a public place in the former two weeks, compared to 58 percent on July 16 and 64 percent on June 2.

Meanwhile, the survey of 1,742 British adults between July 21 and 22 found that other age groups still wear confront coverings at about the alike rate.

The data shows that 69 per cent of all Britons say they have used confront masks in the former two weeks, compared to 71 per cent on July 16 and 73 per cent on June 2.

YouGov also said young people were less likely to be fully vaccinated and more likely to have the NHS Covid-19 application disrupted.

The researcher said that while 38 percent of 18-24-year-olds were avoiding crowded places final week, that has now fallen to 26 percent.

Older generations showed little or no change in their behavior towards crowded places.

Meanwhile, the percentage of Britons who think the government is handling Covid-19 well has fallen from 41 per cent prior ‘Freedom Day’ to 34 per cent thereafter.

Attitudes among Conservative voters fell 17 points this week. Prior to July 19, about three-quarters (73 percent) of Conservative voters believed the government was doing a pleasing job managing the response to the pandemic.

He said: Persuasion is better than coercion.

Tory MP Tom Tugendhat criticized the scheme yesterday, saying it would lead to another form of ID.

“We need to be very watchful not to go from a Brussels-type democracy to a Beijing-style democracy,” the chair of the foreign affairs select committee told TalkRadio.

Other Conservative MPs called the plan “mistaken” and said it risked turning Britain into a two-tiered society.

The Association of Universities and Colleges – which represents universities – said it was “highly discriminatory” against foreign students and those who would not be competent to appeal.

Academics called plans to obtain campus vaccine passports “appalling” and “discriminatory” yesterday as an angry row erupted over the proposals.

The plans, which Boris Johnson is studying, would forbid students from lectures and residence halls if they are not fully vaccinated.

It is one of a number of ideas put forward to urge more young people to take the vaccine amid concerns in the government that many will fail to do so.

The prime minister is said to have been “enraged” about the relatively low rate of vaccine uptake among the under-30s. Subject to some medical exceptions, all students in tertiary and further education settings would effectively confront compulsive strikes if they were to return to life on campus.

The prime minister is understood to have made the proposal during video meetings during his impeachment at Checkers final week. However, work must be done to check its feasibility prior making a decision.

Yesterday the National Student Union (NUS) said young people would lose out on thousands of tuition and accommodations they already signed up for, while President Larissa Kennedy said the plans were “appalling”.

Meanwhile, Joe Grady, of the Association of Universities and Colleges representing the lecturers, said vaccine passports would be “discriminatory against those who cannot vaccinate and international students”.

Understandably, the Ministry of Education has reservations about the idea because universities are self-reliant and study offers are legally binding. The move comes amid fears that less than 60 percent of people aged 18 to 25 have received a first stroke.

The Russell Group of 24 major institutions said ministers needed to “work with students and universities to urge participation”.

Covid cases are now mostly concentrated in younger age groups who are less likely to get a vaccine because they don’t see the virus as a threat.

Official figures show that adults in their beforetime twenties in England were 12 times more likely to contract Covid than those over the age of 60 final week.

Data from the government dashboard showed that people aged 18 to 24 made up 14 percent of cases on July 17.  This was the share of lions and 12 times more than those over 60 years old.

Data from the government dashboard showed that people aged 18 to 24 made up 14 percent of cases on July 17. This was the share of lions and 12 times more than those over 60 years old.

Tom Tugendhat, a member of the Conservative Party (left), said the plan risks turning Britain into a

Education Select Committee Chairman Robert Halfon said the plan was

Tom Tugendhat, a member of the Conservative Party (left), said the plan risks turning Britain into a “Beijing-style democracy”. Education select committee chair Robert Halfon said the plan was “mistaken”.

They were 20 times more likely to be infected than those over the 80s.

It comes following Minister for Children and Families Vicki Ford repeatedly refused to rule out plans during a round of interviews today.

The prime minister has already said clubs will need to be double vaccinated from September to attend late-night venues.

The head of the Conservative Party’s Covid Recovery Group, Mark Harper, said today that plans to get vaccine passports at universities amount to “compulsory vaccination”.

He urged ministers to get back to “persuasion, not panic” to unleash the punches, saying it was “the right public health approach”.

The chairman of the House of Commons Education Committee, Robert Halfon, called the plans “mistaken”.

“It’s something of Huxley’s heroic unused world where people with vaccine passports will be built into the social hierarchy – those who will get a higher education or those who won’t,” Halfon told The Times.

The UCU described the plans as “highly discriminatory”. University general secretary Joe Grady said the plan was to blame students for destitute uptake of the vaccine in young adults.

“Unfortunately, this looks and smells like a prime minister trying to blame students for not taking a vaccine they weren’t prioritized to receive.”

She called on Mr. Johnson to work instead with universities to boost the inclusion of young people.

Referensi: www.dailymail.co.uk

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