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No10 tells councils to quit tearing up bike lanes — or confront funding cuts

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Controversial bike lanes that have angered motorists following drivers’ complaints – following Boris Johnson’s government said they should be evaluated for longer – will not be removed.

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The extensions, which provide space for cyclists to cycle, have angered car owners as they caused heavy traffic as companies try to get employees back to work following the pandemic.

The spillover effects of so-called ‘low congestion neighbourhoods’ have also seen emergency vehicles firm to cross in order to cross roads.

The unused government guidance will tell the councils behind the schemes to “forever leave the cycling and walking schemes in place” lengthy enough for them to be properly evaluated.

The controversial Kensington cycle lane in west London has been removed following hundreds of protests.

The controversial Kensington cycle lane in west London has been removed following hundreds of protests.

A man rides a bicycle in a pop-up bike lane in Park Lane, London, as part of Sadiq Khan's plans

A man rides a bicycle in a pop-up bike lane in Park Lane, London, as part of Sadiq Khan’s plans

Boris Johnson rides a bicycle during a visit to the Canal Side Heritage Center in Beeston

Boris Johnson rides a bicycle during a visit to the Canal Side Heritage Center in Beeston

According to Times Chris Heaton-Harris, the Transportation Secretary said the “boards’ performance in providing active travel infrastructure” would be taken into account when allocating funding.

They say this indicates that the boards who tear up the lanes in a hurry will get less money.

A bike lane on Kensington High Street has been removed by Kensington and Chelsea Council following protests from motorists in less than two months.

Keyhole Bridge in Poole, which was also closed to vehicular traffic under a trial traffic order that saw a parking planter put in place.

Old Shoreham Road in Portslade, Hove, is one of the many that have popped up in the final year

Old Shoreham Road in Portslade, Hove, is one of the many that have popped up in the final year

Khan oversaw the rapid construction of a bicycle net using temporary plastic poles

Khan oversaw the rapid construction of a bicycle net using temporary plastic poles

What is the government’s active travel scheme and why are motorists so perturb?

The government is spending £225m on active travel procedures across the country, most notably in London, Oxford, Manchester, Birmingham and York.

A major initiative launched by the Department for Transport in May allocated £225 million to ’emergency active travel plans for local authorities due to the pandemic’.

The ministry says the money will enable local authorities to produce “unused cycling and walking facilities” and that altered road layouts and parking lots will boost recovery.

However, the Active Emergency Travel Fund money comes with an attached chain. Councils must satisfy officials who “have quick and meaningful plans to reallocate road space to cyclists and pedestrians (both groups rather than one or the other), including strategic lanes.”

Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council have closed the road to cars as part of an active travel scheme to urge people to walk and cycle.

The BCP received about £1.4 million from the government.

But those measures were lifted by transfer wallet owner Mike Green following some members of the public mocked the scheme.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan is a vast fan of bike lanes and is part of a raft of green measures he has backed – which some have interpreted as a “war on motorists”.

They also proved excellent means for councils to deprive taxpayers of their firm-earned wages.

The confusing unused LTNs – many of which are poorly marked – have contributed to the £14m in fines against drivers in London.

Some councils in the capital have switched to using cameras to punish drivers for “moving traffic violations”.

The Department for Transport said councils outside London would be competent to introduce the powers by the end of the year, raising fears of a sharp rise in fines elsewhere.

It is believed that drivers do not understand the “no car” sign – a motorcycle over a car circled in red – used to mark areas.

The sign has been in use since 1964 and is included in the Highway Code.

A YouGov survey found that only half of motorists correctly identified the sign, with 29 percent believing it meant that only cars and motorcycles were allowed on the road.

The familiar “No Entry” sign – a red circle with a white line in the middle – can only be used for one-way streets, when vehicular traffic is allowed in the opposite direction, which is not the case on LTNs.

The government has claimed that support for the 200 LTNs set up in the UK during the pandemic has received more support than cash.

Angry residents on Churchfield Road, in Poole, put up signs protesting the closure of their street and put them in wooden containers

Angry residents on Churchfield Road, in Poole, put up signs protesting the closure of their street and put them in wooden containers

A blue-lit firetruck (pictured) was stopped, a police car driver had to turn around and an ambulance had to move through traffic following congestion built up on the Chiswick Expressway in west London

A blue-lit firetruck (pictured) is stopped, a police driver has to turn and an ambulance has to weave through traffic following congestion builds up on Chiswick High Road in West London

Quiet residential street where council charges £100,000 a week in traffic fines: locals outraged as 475 drivers confront multiple fines on the alike day in the unused low-traffic neighborhood of Islington

Islington Council residents have been criticized for paying more than £100,000 in fines for one street in just one week following putting up ‘completely inadequate’ signs to restrict driving.

Gabe and Stephen Brown, both 64, were amazed when they were slapped with two penalty notices (PCNs) on the alike day in April of this year.

The couple, who live in the nearby neighborhood of Hackney, had traveled by car through Aubert Park, a Highbury road, on their way to and from lunch outside for Stephen’s birthday.

Although the road was familiar to them, having lived in the area for more than 30 years, they had no idea that unused restrictions were being imposed on cars and motorbikes.

After that, they received two fines totaling £260 – at a reduced cost of £65 per fine offered if they were paid within 14 days.

Gabe appealed the fines, arguing that the unused signs were not sufficiently visible, but Islington Council responded saying it was “convinced that the signs are ample and compliant”.

It was later revealed that 6214 PCNs were issued between January 25 and April 23, 2021 – and at £130 per fee, the whole is £807,820.

Of those fined, 475 were vehicles for which more than one PCN oil was issued on the alike day.

Hundreds of Islington residents took to the streets to protest the planned expansion of the Low Traffic Neighborhoods Initiative.

The scheme, which was introduced in London to allow social distancing on footpaths and bike paths during the coronavirus pandemic, has been described as a war on motorists.

Consultations with residents about implementing LTNs are scheduled only following measures have been in place for 18 months, at which point they can provide feedback.

However, the measure – which included installing bike lanes, closing roads to traffic and widening sidewalks – proved unpopular among motorists, especially commuters and taxi drivers in London.

Critics opposed these schemes because of the increased traffic on nearby streets, lengthy car journeys and a lack of consultation.

They were outraged when Mr Khan Transport for London overturned a High Court ruling that the LTN scheme in London was ‘illegal’.

The Mayor of London welcomed the court’s ruling, calling it ‘proof of our policies’ and added: ‘This decision reinforces my determination to make walking and cycling safer and easier for Londoners, and to aid ensure a green and sustainable recovery from pandemics.

“The judges’ decision, along with the vote of Londoners on May 6, is a dual mandate that allows us to persevere our bold actions.”

But angry Londoners criticized the result and took to Twitter to express their disappointment, with some vowing to cease the capital.

One social media user wrote: “If I were to go to work from SE London to NW, it could take about five hours and by the time I got there I wouldn’t be of any use to my patients. What a unintelligent spotted idea.

Save money on transport rather than dealing with transport issues in London. I’m moving from London! You can have everything.’

Another said: Your task is to make it easier for cars and taxis to travel in the capital.

Our business needs rapid transit, not millions of unused bike lanes. Keep our capital moving for pleasing.

While one wrote: “You destroyed the roads and wreaked havoc in London.”

Another said: ‘A horrific decision for all residents, pedestrians and disabled people who have no say and are deeply affected by your unwanted road closure.

“Incredibly, it has made pollution worse and seriously disrupted emergency services during a health crisis.”

In January, a High Court judge ruled that measures announced final year to boost walking and cycling in London and decrease traffic must be “fundamentally modified” in response to the pandemic.

About 89 LTNs were built in London final year, resulting in 62 miles of bike routes in the capital.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has asked TfL to spend at fewest £100m on healthy streets this year.

Other angry Londoners said Mr Khan would make life for the disabled in the capital more firm.

Referensi: www.dailymail.co.uk

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